Tag Archives: blog

Top three ways how agencies should blog

Nobody reads agency blogs, and there are so many out there it’s impossible for people to keep up anyway

                    – Sam Weston, Director of Communications at digital agency Huge

Jack Marshall wrote a very interesting entry, “Agencies Ditch Blogs,” discussing more and more agencies stop blogging and start utilizing social media such as Twitter and Facebook to market themselves.

So is it true nobody reads agency blogs? Well, the answer is simple.

No one reads blogs if content is not worth reading. Period. It’s not about who blogs, but what the blog is about.

Look at blogs from Mullen and 6S Marketing, for example. Their blog posts are not only about their business, but also about trends, industry news…something they’re interested in and passionate about. I personally like reading agency blogs from time to time because their blogs are great resources to keep up with marketing trends and learn about how to engage with audience. I’m not saying that agencies who don’t blog are behind trends or not interested in interacting with their audience, but it’s much clearer to visitors including current and future clients or nerds including me that your agency knows how to build engagement and a relationship with their audience.

Then the questions is, how should agencies blog? Here are top three ways of how to do it.

1. Attract current and new clients (plus nerds like me!)

Who are most likely to read your blog? Clients, of course! Don’t just talk about awards and company news as Marshall points out in his entry. These topics will probably bore your audience easily. Tell your clients what you are passionate about, what you are interested in, what you are currently working on, or what your team is like. Let them know what your agency can bring to them. Use your knowledge and skills you’re always using for your clients for your blog. Think how you would blog for your clients and blog that way. You should know how to market yourself if you know how to market your clients.

2. Make your post simple and useful

Titles are the most important element of your entries. They should tell your audience what they’re going to read about. Make titles eye-catching but simple as well. Your content also needs to be not only simple, but also useful. Nobody wants to read long-written, complicated entries. Your clients want to read something which they can utilize for their business. Using numbers and how-to’s (like what I’m doing for this entry) are two of the most popular ways to optimize your blog.

3. Create engagement

Blogging is not about talking to yourself, but offering something valuable to your audience, and they might give something valuable back to you in return. Ask a question at the end of every post. Include your personal experience and ask your audience to share theirs too. Talk to your audience, not at them.

OK, only three ways are not enough, aren’t they? Do you have any other suggestions on how to blog for agencies? Or are you against agency blogs? If so, why? Please share your opinion in the comment box below!

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Filed under Blog, MKTG 1552, Social Media

Importance of transparency in social media

I did not realize that transparency is an issue in the world of social media until I read this John Cass’ blog post.

I used to run a couple of social media accounts for my clients and write content but I have never considered myself a ghostwriter. I thought that everyone knows that some companies outsource their social media management and no one thinks that it is a problem not to tell the audience about it. Well, if you’ve been in a certain industry for a while, you tend to forget that some standards in your industry do not always apply to different industries or the real world.

Ellie Brown has made some great points about the importance and impact of transparency in social media on her blog. One of her statements made me wonder something regarding my work in the past.

If asked, be honest about who you are.

I have been in a blog team for one of my clients before. On the blog, it was clearly stated that the writers were just freelance writers, not from the company selling the products. The content was also claimed to be written by the writers. However, there was actually so much editing done by my client before the content was published all the time. If you look at the first draft and the finished work, they are completely different. If I were just a reader, not knowing the whole system of this blog, I’d think that these writers know too much about the products and doubt that they are actually an employee of the company. Because my client was extremely passionate about this blog and would like to tell the audience about every single detail of the products, some of the entries were even more detailed than the product pages. The blog itself was very informative, relevant and valuable to the audience and accessed by many people from around the world. It was a successful blog.

Yet, is the content really transparent? Does everyone know that some of the published work in social media is edited, monitored, or controlled by the client(s), although it is stated that someone not from the company writes the content? Is transparency important in every part of social media?

Transparency may not always matter to some degree in the world of social media.

In my opinion, I don’t mind who writes the content and how much editing has been taken place by their clients before the content is published online as long as it is valuable to audience. However, I hesitate to say that the content is transparent.

What do you think? If you would like to share your opinion, feel free to post a comment.

Until next time!

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Filed under Blog, MKTG 1552, Social Media